The face is flushed, the breath has the odor of liquor, the pulse is full and bounding with deep respiration. Reason, memory, judgment and will are first stimulated and then blunted. The drinker's peculiarities are exaggerated, the person becoming ... Read more of ALCOHOLISM. Acute Symptoms at Home Medicine.caInformational Site Network Informational
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First Personal Pronoun
The use of the first personal pronoun should be avoided as mu...

Neithernor
When two singular subjects are connected by neither, nor use ...

Definitions
A Pronoun is a word used for or instead of a noun to keep us ...

The Pronouns
Very many mistakes occur in the use of the pronouns. "Let you...

The English Language In A Nutshell
All the words in the English language are divided into nine g...

Adverb
An adverb is a word which modifies a verb, an adjective or an...

Past Perfect Tense
Sing. Plural ...

Requirements Of Speech
It is very easy to learn how to speak and write correct...


THREE ESSENTIALS




Divisions of Grammar Definitions - Etymology.

The three essentials of the English language are: Purity, Perspicuity
and Precision.

By Purity is signified the use of good English. It precludes the use of
all slang words, vulgar phrases, obsolete terms, foreign idioms, ambiguous
expressions or any ungrammatical language whatsoever. Neither does it
sanction the use of any newly coined word until such word is adopted by
the best writers and speakers.

Perspicuity demands the clearest expression of thought conveyed in
unequivocal language, so that there may be no misunderstanding whatever
of the thought or idea the speaker or writer wishes to convey. All
ambiguous words, words of double meaning and words that might possibly be
construed in a sense different from that intended, are strictly
forbidden. Perspicuity requires a style at once clear and comprehensive
and entirely free from pomp and pedantry and affectation or any straining
after effect.

Precision requires concise and exact expression, free from redundancy
and tautology, a style terse and clear and simple enough to enable the
hearer or reader to comprehend immediately the meaning of the speaker or
writer. It forbids, on the one hand, all long and involved sentences,
and, on the other, those that are too short and abrupt. Its object is to
strike the golden mean in such a way as to rivet the attention of the
hearer or reader on the words uttered or written.




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